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How to get the wet and wavy look on african american hair

Newsflash: Black women spend a lot of time and money to maintain their hair. As a Black woman in a family of Black women, with a gaggle of Black women friends, this was entirely unsurprising. We are serious about our hair. Our hair can affect our moods. Our hair has its own vocabulary. It bonds us together in the style successes and struggles.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Wet & Wavy Short Hair Tutorial

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: WATER WET LOOK on Natural Hair! (3C) ACTUALLY WORKS!!-Liyah Joinee

How to Use A Hair Sponge on 4C Hair

Afro-textured hair is the natural hair texture of certain populations in Africa mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa , the African diaspora , Oceania and in some parts of South and Southeast Asia.

Each strand of this hair type grows in a tiny, angle-like helix shape. The overall effect is such that, compared to straight , wavy or curly hair, [1] afro-textured hair appears denser. Jean Baptiste Bory de Saint-Vincent in introduced the scientific term Oulotrichi for the purpose of human taxonomy. In hairstylist Andre Walker created a numerical grading system for human hair types. Those variations include pattern mainly tight coils , pattern size watch spring to chalk , density sparse to dense , strand diameter fine, medium, coarse , and feel cottony, woolly, spongy.

The chart below is the most commonly used chart to help determine hair types: [5]. Different ethnic groups have observable differences in the structure, density, and growth rate of hair.

With regard to structure, all human hair has the same basic chemical composition in terms of keratin protein content. Franbourg et al.

Specifically, the average density of afro-textured hair was found to be approximately hairs per square centimeter. This was significantly lower than that of Caucasian hair, which, on average, has approximately hairs per square centimeter.

The more coiled the hair texture, the higher its shrinkage. An individual hair's shape is never completely circular. The cross-section of a hair is an ellipse , which can tend towards a circle or be distinctly flattened. Asiatic heads of straight hair are formed from almost-round hairs, and Caucasian hair's cross sections form oval shapes.

Afro-textured hair has a flattened cross-section and is finer, and its ringlets can form tight circles with diameters of only a few millimeters. In humans worldwide, Asiatic hair is the most common, whereas afro-textured hair is the least common. This is because the former hair texture is typical of the large populations inhabiting East Asia as well as the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Afro-textured hair strands can possess "torsion twists", where the hair strand turns around itself.

These torsion twists may prevent the hair strands from coiling into tight curls, instead separating them and allowing the hair as a whole to have a fluffier, more undefined look. Clarence suggests that afro-textured hair may have initially evolved because of an adaptive need amongst humans' early hominid ancestors for protection against the intense UV radiation of the sun in Africa. According to Clarence , afro-textured hair may have been adaptive for the earliest modern humans in Africa because the relatively sparse density of such hair, combined with its elastic helix shape, results in an airy effect.

The resulting increased circulation of cool air onto the scalp may have thus served to facilitate the body-temperature-regulation system of hominids while they lived on the open savannah. Instead of sticking to the neck and scalp when damp as do straighter textures , unless completely drenched it tends to retain its basic springiness. Historically, many cultures in continental Africa developed hairstyles that defined status, or identity, in regards to age, ethnicity, wealth, social rank, marital status, religion, fertility, adulthood, and death.

Hair was carefully groomed by those who understood the aesthetic standard, as the social implications of hair grooming were a significant part of community life. Dense, thick, clean, and neatly groomed hair was something highly admired and sought after. Hair groomers possessed unique styling skills, allowing them to create a variety of designs that met the local cultural standards.

Hair was usually dressed according to local culture. In many traditional cultures, communal grooming was a social event when a woman could socialize and strengthen bonds between herself, other women and their families. Historically, hair braiding was not a paid trade.

Since the African diaspora , in the 20th and 21st centuries it has developed as a multimillion-dollar business in such regions as the United States, South Africa and western Europe. An individual's hair groomer was usually someone whom they knew closely. Sessions can include shampooing, oiling, combing, braiding and twisting, plus adding accessories. For shampooing, black soap was widely used in nations in West and Central Africa.

Additionally, palm oil and palm kernel oil were popularly used for oiling the scalp. Shea butter has traditionally been used to moisturize and dress the hair.

Fijian chieftain Tui Namosi with natural afro-textured hair worn in an Afro , circa Damara boy from Namibia Fang man from Gabon with asymmetrically styled afro-textured hair c. Nuba woman in Sudan with micro-braided afro-textured hair, Diasporic Africans in the Americas have been experimenting with ways to style their hair since their arrival in the Western Hemisphere well before the 19th century.

Africans captured as slaves no longer had the sort of resources to practice hair grooming that they had had when home.

The enslaved Africans adapted as best they could under the circumstances, finding sheep-fleece carding tools particularly useful for detangling their hair. They suffered from scalp diseases and infestations due to their living conditions. Enslaved people used varying remedies for disinfecting and cleansing their scalps, such as applying kerosene or cornmeal directly on the scalp with a cloth as they carefully parted the hair.

Enslaved field hands often shaved their hair and wore hats to protect their scalps against the sun. House slaves had to appear tidy and well-groomed. The men sometimes wore wigs mimicking their masters', or similar hairstyles, while the women typically plaited or braided their hair. During the 19th century, hair styling, especially among women, became more popular. Cooking grease such as lard , butter and goose grease , were used to moisturize the hair.

Women sometimes used hot butterknives to curl their hair. Because of the then-prevalent notion that straight hair was more acceptable than kinky hair, many black people began exploring solutions for straightening , or relaxing, their tresses. One post-slavery solution was a mixture of lye , egg and potato, which burned the scalp upon contact. In s United States, natural afro-textured hair was transformed from a simple expression of style into a revolutionary political statement.

It became a fundamental tool of the Black movement in America, and "[h]air came to symbolize either a continued move toward integration in the American political system or a growing cry for Black power and nationalism.

At this time, an African-American person's "ability to conform to mainstream standards of beauty [was] tied to being successful. The pressing comb and chemical straighteners became stigmatized within the community as symbols of oppression and imposed White beauty ideals. Certain Black people sought to embrace beauty and affirm and accept their natural physical traits. One of the ultimate goals of the Black movement was to evolve to a level where Black people "were proud of black skin and kinky or nappy hair.

As a result, natural hair became a symbol of that pride. Wearing natural hair was seen as a progressive statement, and for all the support that the movement gathered, there were many who opposed natural hair both for its aesthetics and the ideology that it promoted. It caused tensions between the Black and White communities, as well as discomfort amongst more conservative African-Americans.

The style of afro-textured hair continues to be politicized in contemporary society. In several post-colonial societies, the value system promotes ' white bias ', and "ethnicities are valorized according to the tilt of whiteness—[which] functions as the ideological basis for status ascription.

Racism 'works' by encouraging the devaluation of self-identity by the victims themselves, and that re-centering of a sense of pride is a prerequisite for a politics of resistance and reconstruction. In this system, "hair functions as a key 'ethnic signifier' because, compared with bodily shape or facial features, it can be changed more easily by cultural practices such as straightening.

Natural hairstyles, such as the Afro and dreadlocks , "counter-politicized the signifier of ethnic devalorization, redefining Blackness as a positive attribute". Wearing one's hair naturally also opens up a new debate: Are those who decide to still wear their hair straightened, for example, less 'Black' or 'proud' of their heritage, than those who decide to wear their hair naturally?

This debate is an often-ongoing topic of discussion within the community. The issue is highly debated and disputed, creating almost a social divide within the community between those who decide to be natural and those who do not. After the American Civil War and emancipation , many African-Americans migrated to larger towns or cities, where they were influenced by new styles.

The photos below show 19th-century women leaders with a variety of styles with natural hair. Others straightened their hair to conform to White beauty ideals. They wanted to succeed, and to avoid mistreatment including legal and social discrimination. Some women, and a smaller number of men, lightened their hair with household bleach.

A variety of caustic products that contained bleaches, including laundry bleach, designed to be applied to afro-textured hair, were developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as African Americans demanded more fashion options.

They used creams and lotions, combined with hot irons, to straighten their hair. The Black hair care industry was initially dominated by White-owned businesses. Walker , Madam Gold S. Young, Sara Spencer Washington and Garrett Augustus Morgan revolutionized hair care by inventing and marketing chemical and heat-based applications to alter the natural tightly curled texture.

They rapidly became successful and dominated the Black hair care market. Men began using pomades, among other products, to achieve the standard aesthetic look. During the s, conking vividly described in The Autobiography of Malcolm X became an innovative method in the U. Women at that time tended either to wear wigs, or to hot-comb their hair rather than conk it in order to temporarily mimic a straight style without permanently altering the natural curl pattern.

Popular until the s, the conk hair style was achieved through the application of a painful lye , egg and potato mixture that was toxic and immediately burned the scalp. Black-owned businesses in the hair-care industry provided jobs for thousands of African-Americans. These business owners gave back strongly to the African-American community. These offered permanents and hair-straightening , as well as cutting and styling services, some to both White and Black clients.

In this era, men regularly went to barber shops to have their beards groomed, and some Black barbers developed exclusively White, elite clientele, sometimes in association with hotels or clubs. Media images tended to perpetuate the ideals of European beauty of the majority culture, even when featuring African-Americans. African-Americans began sponsoring their own beauty events. The winners, many of whom wore straight hair styles and some of whom were of mixed race , adorned Black magazines and product advertisements.

In the early 20th century, media portrayal of traditional African hair styles, such as braids and cornrows, was associated with African-Americans who were poor and lived in rural areas.

In the early decades of the Great Migration , when millions of African Americans left the South for opportunities in northern and midwestern industrial cities, many African Americans wanted to leave this rural association behind. Civil rights activist and suffragist Ida B. Wells in styled natural hair. Photo taken between and

Hair Guides

Once you begin learning more about black hair, you'll soon discover that it comes in way more than one texture. Black hair can run the gamut from straight to slightly wavy to super tight coils, but many people of African descent find that their natural hair falls somewhere in between. You don't have to be biracial or multiracial to have hair that's described as "naturally curly.

Tia Delaney has been seeing the same hairstylist once or twice a week for more than 20 years. Stay-at-home orders have shuttered salons and beauty supply stores, while social distancing has made house visits a risky endeavor for hair braiders and their clients.

Ask any natural-haired person—curls can be both a blessing and a curse. When curls are behaving, they can look bouncy, luxurious, Solange-level fierce. But on a bad hair day, they might fall flat. To give your curls definition and hold, you've got to understand what's causing the issue, and how prep, products, and best practices can help you fix it.

8 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Black Women’s Hair

Sashaying down the AW19 runways at Haider Ackermann, Burberry and Fashion East and appearing on red carpets everywhere Margot Robbie, Allison Williams and Vanessa Kirby we're looking at you , wet look hair is officially the high fashion 'do to be working on your next night out out. Frankly, if Kaia Gerber's working wet look finger waves, we want to work wet look finger waves. To the untrained eye it might look like you've just stepped out of the shower, but there's actually way more to styling wet look hair than you might think. Is it just water or does that dry? How do you keep it looking wet all day? Is gel back?? These are the questions, people. We caught up with pro hair stylist and the man responsible for Poppy Delevingne and Ashley Benson's A-list-worthy hair, Larry King , to talk us through his tips and tricks for nailing wet look hair that looks oh-so haute couture. To do this mix a little hair gel and shine cream between your hands and smooth through the hair from front to back, comb through to get it all in place and finish by smoothing out the comb lines with your fingers.

How To Keep Curls from Falling Flat

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From Marilyn Monroe to Beyonce, ladies with curls are often envied by their straight-haired counterparts. A curly coif represents freedom, strength, and independence.

It can be difficult to know which tips to follow without knowing your hair type. This hair type guide serves to explain your hair type, and includes a few tips to best care for your hair. Hair type and curl pattern describe the specific shape of your hair strands, the way it naturally grows.

10 Curly Hair Tips for Well-Defined Curls

The Wet Look has become a massive hair trend on social media during the first half of , particularly on YouTube. Recently, everybody with some sort of curl or wave to their hair has been trying it out. Business in the front, party in the back!

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: THE WET LOOK ON MY NATURAL HAIR! - HOW TO MAKE IT WORK FOR YOU - TYPE 3 HAIR!

Black curly hairstyles are amazingly beautiful, chic and creative. African-American women have gorgeous yet unique hair texture that require some special love and care to look its best. From long loose curls to shorter cropped styles, here are 30 ideas for those who search a new way to sport black curly hair. Curly hairstyles flatter African American women immensely, regardless of length. Here are some pictures of the most beautiful curly looks for inspiration! From casual to formal, this hairstyle can literally be worn for any occasion and it looks great when paired with any outfit.

Wet Look Hair - How To Get The Slicked Back Hair Look Right

Afro-textured hair is the natural hair texture of certain populations in Africa mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa , the African diaspora , Oceania and in some parts of South and Southeast Asia. Each strand of this hair type grows in a tiny, angle-like helix shape. The overall effect is such that, compared to straight , wavy or curly hair, [1] afro-textured hair appears denser. Jean Baptiste Bory de Saint-Vincent in introduced the scientific term Oulotrichi for the purpose of human taxonomy. In hairstylist Andre Walker created a numerical grading system for human hair types. Those variations include pattern mainly tight coils , pattern size watch spring to chalk , density sparse to dense , strand diameter fine, medium, coarse , and feel cottony, woolly, spongy.

Giving your hair the wet look involves the use of products like moisturizer. Find out how to give African Sep 10, - Uploaded by ehowbeauty.

Many times we get requests from people wanting to know ho to get their naturally textured hair to look more curly or wavy. They want to continue to wear their hair natural chemical free. But, want less kinkiness or frizz than you'd get in a "plain old 'fro". They're looking for something that is a little more fashionable and sophisticated.

Afro-textured hair

Many people of African descent have textured hair that is more prone to heat damage and drying out. They either don't work on black hair, damage it, or make it frizzy. Fortunately, it is still possible to add curls to black hair.

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