Author Archives: yousefhatlani

LIVE: Napalm Death, Melvins, Melt-Banana – Roseland

Melvins // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Melvins // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Words and photos by Yousef Hatlani.

How many bands have been born of the Melvins’ northwestern sonic toil? Likewise, how many groups have formed as a direct result of Napalm Death’s genre-founding 1987 album Scum? The lineage of these two bands is among the strongest in all of heavy music; nary an influential group in the spectrum of alternative rock to extreme metal –from Nirvana to Tool to Boris to Carcass to Sunn 0))) to Soilent Green—doesn’t owe a debt to them. And though the two collectives share a history of rotating members, the integrity of their output has remained distinct for over three decades.

2016, then, is shaping up to be another fruitful year for both bands: Napalm are touring on the back of their 2015 release, Apex Predator – Easy Meat—lauded as one of the group’s best in their sixteen album-strong discography. Melvins are putting out not one, but two records: a collaborative album titled Three Men and a Baby—recorded with godheadSilo bassist Mike Kunka in 1999 and finally seeing the light of day last month—and Basses Loaded, a full-length featuring all of the group’s current roster of bass players (as well as a guest spot by Krist Novoselic.) In addition to offering new songs, the album compiles an EP and a split release with Le Butcherretes that the band put out last year (Beer Hippy and Chaos as Usual, respectively,) as well as another EP from January of this year, called War Pussy. Teaming up with Japanese noiseniks Melt-Banana, the trio embarked on the appropriately titled ‘Savage Imperial Death March’ tour in late March—stopping by Portland’s Roseland Theater on Tuesday.

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Live: Soul’d Out 2016

Sharon Jones at Keller Auditorium // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Sharon Jones at Keller Auditorium // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Words and photos by Yousef Hatlani

Among the many music festivals Portland offers every year, from Pickathon to Project Pabst to PDX Pop Now!, Soul’d Out has been perhaps the most consistent since its inception. Founded in 2009, there has nary been a year when its list of headliners did not spring off the page with inimitable options: both Buddy Guy and the late Gil-Scott Heron played during the festival’s inaugural year. In 2011, it boasted sets by Ms. Lauryn Hill, Mos Def and Ice Cube. The following year featured Esperanza Spalding, Justice and a special show with Wanda Jackson and Sallie Ford. The year after that had Lee “Scratch” Perry, Booker T. Jones and Prince. Slick Rick, Ural Thomas, Charles Bradley and Robert Glasper are also some of the names of those who’ve played Soul’d Out in recent years. Clearly, this festival is curated with a lot of love for its craft—as much as those who are booked to play it.

2016’s lineup proved no different, ranging from George Clinton to SZA on one night, to Hieroglyphics and Thomas Jack the next, and Bilal playing across the street from Bunny Wailer on another. Faces on the Radio was able to catch three such shows on three different nights of the festival: First, Gary Clark Jr at the Roseland, followed by Sharon Jones at the Keller Auditorium, and finally returning to the Roseland for Anderson .Paak & the Free Nationals.

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Soul’d Out 2016 Kicks Off Next Week

By Yousef Hatlani

Festival season dawns upon the city of Portland around this time every year—just as the sun starts to come out and the air glides by us as crisply as the sharpness of Oregon’s blue summer skies. And no local music festival is as illustrative of this inauguration as the annual Soul’d Out, a celebration of all things funk, soul, blues, hip hop, electronic and rock—serving as, maybe more than anything, a go-to wellspring for vetted, authentic talent.

Dating back to April 2010, past editions of the festival have seen the likes of Prince, Gil Scott-Heron, Lauryn Hill, Ice Cube, Buddy Guy, Booker, T. Jones, Lee “Scratch” Perry, Steel Pulse, Charles Bradley, Esperanza Spalding, Justice…the list goes on; it manages to create a cohesive format that, at the same time, is refreshingly diverse in its approach—making it one of the year’s absolutely essential festival attractions, boasting acts for classicists and newcomers alike.

This year’s edition of the festival—kicking off next Wednesday, April 13th—upholds its longstanding tradition of high-caliber talent; headliners include funk forebears George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Texas blues incarnate Gary Clark Jr, Reggae icon Bunny Wailer, undying soulstress Sharon Jones and Americana heroine Bonnie Raitt. Youthful innovation is also heartily represented, featuring sets by Thundercat, SZA, Bilal, and Anderson.Paak, as are local acts in Ural Thomas, 1939 Ensemble, Asher Fulero Band and the Quick & Easy Boys. There is also an Allen Toussaint tribute, as well as a not-to-be-missed reunion of legendary Oakland, CA hip hop crew Hieroglyphics—in addition to several other outstanding shows that round out the full lineup, spanning no less that nine venues over five days.

As a refresher, you can check out Faces on the Radio’s April 2015 interview with festival organizers Nick Harris and Haytham Abdulhadi here—going into the origins of Soul’d Out, its most memorable moments and the dream acts they’d love to book (although, as they admit, it’s pretty hard to top Prince.)

Soul’d Out 2016 runs April 13th-April 17th, at various venues. Full ticketing and schedule information can be found at Souldoutfestival.com.

Live: Battle Cries & Champagne: A Celebration of David Bowie – Holocene

Words and photos by Yousef Hatlani

Holocene // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Holocene // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Where were you when David Bowie died? A universally affecting shock recalling the deaths of John Lennon and Michael Jackson, news of Bowie’s death seemingly froze everyone it reached—forever crystallizing the moment they were in. More so than many iconic presences, David Bowie occupied a heavenly reverential—and, evidently, quite personal—space in the minds and hearts of just about everyone; whether it was the first time Aladdin Sane’s sleeve gazed back at you in its face-painted glory, or his groundbreaking mid-70’s partnership with Brian Eno, or his memorable role in Labyrinth, or the myriad of artists who’ve openly revered him for the last forty-five-plus years, Bowie’s myth thoroughly penetrated aspects of culture ranging from the minute to the mainstream.  And like Motörhead’s Lemmy Kilmister, whom we also paid tribute to last month, he was around just long enough for you to feel like he could almost be with us forever.

Perhaps, then, that is why David Bowie’s passing was so hard to process; his reach was so vast for so long, it was hard to picture a world without his familiar presence. At the time, it was effectively so difficult to put into words that we at Faces on the Radio could not fathom summarizing the man’s career in an eight or nine hundred word missive; it would surely not even scratch the surface of his influence. Even listening to his back catalog as a means of grieving was a challenge. Tributes poured in immediately: innumerable magazine covers, acknowledgements from every late night talk show on television, a Bowie-themed march in New Orleans hosted by Arcade Fire and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band that attracted thousands, and a decree from New York mayor Bill de Blasio that January 20th, 2016 was David Bowie Day.

It wasn’t long before Portland would get its own batch of Bowie tributes, ranging from added showings of the 1976 cult classic The Man Who Fell to Earth at the Academy Theater to an upcoming Ziggy-centric evening at the Mission Theatre, hosted by the Parson Red Heads. On Wednesday night, Holocene held its own night honoring the Starman—with a portion of the proceeds going to the American Cancer Society.

Labyrinth playing above Holocene's bar. // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Labyrinth playing above Holocene’s bar. // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

This was the latest chapter in Holocene’s successful history of tribute shows; the venue has held themed homages to several artists in just the last two years, including Sade, Kate Bush, Drake (on his twenty-ninth birthday, no less,) and, most recently, Janet Jackson. The enthusiasm for Wednesday night’s tribute to David Bowie carried on with this tradition; in addition to Labyrinth and other archival Bowie footage being projected over the bar all night, special commemorative posters were designed for the show by local firm Obitay Designs—the proceeds of which also went to the American Cancer Society. Moreover, the evening boasted short sets by no less than six bands—each of them touching on visual elements Bowie held throughout the years.

The Heavy Hustle // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

The Heavy Hustle // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

The Heavy Hustle kicked the night off, performing from the venue’s dance floor stage. Band members had specially made black shirts emblazoned with the group’s logo in gold, featuring a star cut out in the middle and ‘The Stars Look Very Different Today’ printed below. Opening with “Rebel Rebel,” continuing with “Fame” and ending with “Let’s Dance,” the band properly set the tone for the evening with sheer funk and fervor, drawing an impressive crowd. After them, on the primary stage, was quintet Haste—surprisingly the only group of the night that attempted “Space Oddity,” before ending their set with the night’s second “Rebel Rebel” (prior to which their guitar player donned an appropriate eyepatch.)

Back on the dance floor stage, local quartet The Breaking (whose vocalist was in full Pinups era facepaint) began with “Ziggy Stardust” before delving into two somewhat deeper cuts: “Where Are We Now?,” the lead single from 2013’s The Next Day—which featured an extended outro that made for one of the most memorable performances of the night, and a rock-centric version of the IDM-flavored “Dead Man Walking,” off of 1997’s Earthling.

The Breaking // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

The Breaking // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Returning to the main stage, disco/dance troupe Gold Casio took on Station to Station’s “Golden Years,” the undying choruses of “Under Pressure” and the brute rock stylings of Hunky Dory’s “Queen Bitch.” PWRHAUS then continued the show with three more Hunky Dory cuts—“Life on Mars,” “Kooks,” and “Fill Your Heart”—before ending their set with “Starman,” eliciting a chorus that made for arguably the best singalong of the evening, lifting Holocene into blissful refrain.

PWRHAUS // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

PWRHAUS // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Perhaps the highlight of the show was supergroup Boys Keep Swinging, a ten piece ensemble featuring members of several notable local groups—among them Wampire, Blouse, Appendixes and the Gossip. With a set consisting of seven songs, the group took full advantage of its instrumentation with many of Bowie’s more sonically diverse works—including “Station to Station,” “Young Americans” and “Oh! You Pretty Things” (the night’s fifth Hunk Dory track)—capping an evening of consistent showmanship with pomp and splendor.

Boys Keep Swinging // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Boys Keep Swinging // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

David Bowie’s influence was as evident in life as it is in death; he lived as a legend, and literally was the “What Could Have Been.” He did this through generosity and a strikingly uncompromising vision—not to mention a professionalism and rigor that never let up during his storied career, even as he was approaching his twilight. If Holocene’s tribute was any indication, those exalting Bowie the most often have powerful artistic visions of their own. As time passes, the full extent of that influence will reveal itself still—our hearts and minds forever richer for it.

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In Memoriam: Motörhead’s Ian “Lemmy” Kilmister.

By Yousef Hatlani

Lemmy from a photo session for his 2002 autobiography, "White Line Fever" // Photo by Nicola Rübenberg

Lemmy from a photo session for his 2002 autobiography, White Line Fever // Photo by Nicola Rübenberg

Until yesterday night, Lemmy Kilmister was probably the very last person you would expect to see in the Obituaries section; he, perhaps along with only Keith Richards, had helped mythologize his career by successfully appearing stronger than death. At age seventy, the man born Ian Fraser Kilmister had spent five decades unapologetically emblemizing the very music he created—dating back to the eras that engendered both rock & roll and heavy metal as we know it. The concept of marrying sheer volume with youthful rebellion was born in his lifetime, and he experienced the genesis firsthand.

Kilmister could rightly claim to have seen Buddy Holly live, to have roadied for Jimi Hendrix and to remember a time before Elvis Presley was ever heard on the radio—because it was all true. In many respects, Lemmy was the purest personification that several generations may ever see of the rock and roll lifestyle.

In light of growing up during the most crucial eras of classic rock and roll, Kilmister later grabbed his teachings with a clenched fist and plugged them all into a distortion pedal. Then he took the train-kept-a-rolling backbeat that kicked up the music of early country rebels like Johnny Cash and tempered it into a nonstop double bass assault. Finally, he achieved his sonic focus by emphasizing not the electric guitar, but snarling, distorted bass—an uncommon idea in his day.

Following early stints with the Rockin’ Vickers, Sam Gopal, Opal Butterfly and—most prominently—Hawkwind, Motörhead was born in June 1975 with such a mixture in mind. From there on, Lemmy began every single, solitary show with a simple decree: “We are Motörhead, and we play rock and roll.” And thus speed metal was inadvertently born; whereas Black Sabbath largely invented the genre and Judas Priest’s combo of vocal tremors & twin guitar attack added characteristic virility, Motörhead’s specialty was unadulterated brashness, authenticity and hustle. They looked and sounded like they were from the streets. If they moved in next door, as Lemmy would say, your lawn would die.

Lemmy with Joey Ramone, 1990's.

Lemmy with Joey Ramone, 1990’s.

In Motörhead’s wake came the thrash metal of the early 1980’s; Metallica, Slayer, Megadeth, Anthrax and just about every successful band from that era could (and did) lay claim to emulating Lemmy’s swagger without flinching. Classic thrash albums like Kill ‘Em All, Show No Mercy, Killing is My Business and Fistful of Metal all point back to the undying tread of Motörhead’s  Overkill, Ace of Spades and the legendary live document No Sleep ‘til Hammersmith—which, as you may have guessed, directly inspired the Beastie Boys anthem “No Sleep ‘til Brooklyn,” as well as Metallica’s first demo, entitled No Life ‘til Leather, the Stiff Little Fingers live album No Sleep ‘til Belfast and about a zillion other cultural references. Their mark had been made.

Despite predating most heavy metal bands, Motörhead still recorded and toured more consistently than most groups half their age, releasing a total of twenty-two studio albums over thirty-eight years—never wavering in quality or concentration. Quite plainly, this was Lemmy Kilmister’s life and—as he admitted in the 2010 documentary that bears his name—he did not know how to do much else.

That simple admission, however, bore much more weight than Kilmister may have realized: rock and roll was literally Lemmy’s life. The Blackbeard-esque splendor, the ever-present mutton chops, the top hat, tight jeans and permanent middle finger were not just a stage getup—they were his everyday wardrobe. He was inextricable from the slot machines and Jack & Cokes at the Rainbow, the legendary Sunset Strip bar & grill just down the street from the Los Angeles apartment he lived in for twenty-five years. He also smoked ceaselessly into his 60’s. The Ultimate Badass, it seemed as though nothing could ever stop him.

Lemmy playing Tempest at Portland, OR's Ground Kontrol Classic Arcade, October 3rd, 2009. He set two high scores that day. // Photo by Art Santana

Lemmy playing Tempest at Portland, OR’s Ground Kontrol Classic Arcade, 10/3/09. He set two high scores that day. // Photo by Art Santana

In reality, the fabled rock and roll lifestyle took its toll on his body: in a 2013 interview with the New York Times, Lemmy admitted that he was “paying for the good times,” and that he had given up smoking. Just wine every now and then, that’s it. The band also canceled a European tour that year in a rare showing of frailty. Ultimately, the band did soldier on and play several shows over the following two years, although many were cut short or canceled altogether—all the while recording & releasing what would be their final album, the well-received Bad Magic, in August 2015. Kilmister’s later public appearances revealed him to be progressively thinner, gaunt and in poor health.

So, was Lemmy really stronger than death? The answer, all things considered, is perhaps another question: does it really matter? Kilmister’s grit and growl has provided the very lifeblood for heavy metal’s most defining bands over the last thirty-five years, embodying the take-no-guff attitude that anyone would want to adorn so surely. That a man who once exclaimed in his 2002 autobiography he “should be dead, medically speaking,” lived to be a full seventy years old epitomizes the Motörhead maxim of ‘Everything Louder Than Everything Else.’ With this, Lemmy had decidedly accomplished the mission he set out with forty years ago, inaugurated with the unrelenting rallying cry of “We are Motörhead, and we play rock and roll”: simply put, he played rock and roll—and the world will be forever louder for it.

The Year in Photos, 2015.

Charles Bradley at the Roseland, 4.14.15 // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Charles Bradley at the Roseland, 4.14.15 // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

From Beirut to Blondie, Primal Scream to Puscifer, Sabonis to Sleep, Steve Earle to Stephen Malkmus and Wild Ones to Weezer, 2015 was filled with several outstanding shows—many of them documented by our own Yousef Hatlani. As we do on the last Sunday of every year (since 2013, anyway,) we’ve culled 50 of most memorable photos from the last twelve months—and can now present them in one neat package: our annual Year in Photos feature. Check out the complete collection on our Facebook page now.

LIVE: Kiasmos at Holocene

Words and photos by Yousef Hatlani

Kiasmos // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Kiasmos // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

If appreciation is the currency of success, it’s no wonder why Kiasmos are standing stronger than ever after six years: for a dense ninety minutes at Holocene on Thursday night, the Icelandic dance duo—made up of Ólafur Arnalds and Janus Rasmussen—were as visibly elated by performing as the teeming room before them. They were grinning throughout, both at the audience and at each other, and motioned with their hands to let ‘er rip right before a drop—usually once or twice per song.

At first glance, that might sound like an all-purpose description of any average EDM set. In reality, this was a special occasion: Kiasmos is the union of ambient/pop crossover prodigy Arnalds—who, along with friend, collaborator and label mate Nils Frahm, is one of the last decade’s most inventive neoclassical composers—and Rasmussen, best known as the mastermind behind electronic collective Bloodgroup.

The symbiotic relationship of these two minds is absolutely apt, with Arnalds’ swelling strings and Rasumussen’s crisp beats proving to be a natural fit for each other—creating a more emotionally intelligent thread in the field of graceful techno; music that inherently ties itself to memories.

Their secret weapon is charming juxtaposition: Arnalds’ Bach-derived melodies lift and glide alongside undercurrents of distorted bass. A warm, dejected piano anchors the stop-start snares around it. Meditative violins counterbalance sharp synths & reversed keyboards. The effect this has in a live setting is euphoric; there was no middle ground in the scope of enjoyment for Thursday night’s spectators—some were bowing their head in thought and reflection, while others were acrobatic. Just about everyone was captivated.

The group stopped by Holocene as part of a small, five-date North American tour promoting their newest release: an EP titled Swept, released just last month. The evening started with an ambient-centric DJ set by Beacon Sounds, followed by an appearance from opener Strategy, the project of local electronic producer Paul Dickow.

Strategy // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Strategy // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Armed with a vintage Roland 606 drum machine, an Electro-Harmonix Memory Man and two other fancy pieces of equipment I can’t pretend to know the names of, Dickow commenced his performance from the floor with the touch of a button and a nod of the head. As the show’s pace-setter, Strategy’s music impeccably combined many of the best elements of dub, house, jungle and ambient in a set lasting about forty five minutes. An imposing crowd had formed early on, upholding an energy that did not let up for the rest of the night.

Ólafur Arnalds // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Ólafur Arnalds // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

By the time Kiasmos took the stage, the room had filled with vapors from smoke machines and lights so effervescent that many couldn’t resist touching their rays. When the duo’s silhouettes popped up in front of their projector screen, brooding strings made way for the playful hi-hats of album opener “Lit”—a sensible, levitating track that thumped with youthful poise. What followed was a set that leaned largely on their 2014 self-titled debut, including fan pleasers “Looped,” Thrown,” “Burnt” and “Swayed”—perhaps the most straightforward dance track in the group’s catalog.

Considering how subdued Ólafur Arnalds’ own music is compared to Kiasmos’, it was quite a sight to see the twenty-nine year old composer having so much fun on stage; while in any other setting he would otherwise be crouched over at his piano, delivering brilliantly deadpan banter between songs, both he and Rasmussen were bopping, exhaling and pointing upward with every buildup and breakdown. It was a refreshing sincerity—evidenced by great music.

Janus Rasmussen // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Janus Rasmussen // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

However, it wasn’t until set-ender “Bent”—a brilliantly melded contrast of introspection and extraversion—that everything climaxed: after one fluid hour of four-on-the-floor dexterity, Holocene seemed to float into a collective rapture. About four minutes into the song, sentimental violins and furious bass clash perfectly. At that point, everything just locked into place: People around me all had their eyes closed. Sweat seemed to drip in tempo. The beat delivered everyone from their inhibitions and fears. And even as I stepped outside when it was all over, only to be greeted by the nimble but unsympathetic rainfall, the music lingered still—carrying with it a sense of warmth and hope.

Live: Puscifer at the Keller Auditorium

Words and photos by Yousef Hatlani

 

Maynard James Keenan with Puscifer // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Maynard James Keenan with Puscifer // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

“It’s tough having heroes,” Lester Bangs wrote in 1976, reviewing David Bowie’s cocaine-fueled disco landmark Station to Station. “Hero-worshippers (fans) must live with the continually confirmed dread of hero-slippage and humiliating personal compromises in your standards and plain good sense about, oh, two to three weeks after the new elpee masterwork first hits our turntables.”

Maynard James Keenan—by then known only by his first name, James—had just graduated from high school the year Bangs died at age 33. If only the legendary rock critic had lived long enough to see Keenan’s often fanatical fan base, he may have been faced with something of an exception to that truism:  between Tool, A Perfect Circle and Puscifer, Keenan has fashioned a catalog reliable in both quality and curiosity. It has also bred legions upon legions of fans, ranging from the analytical to the absurd—time and again acknowledged by Keenan himself as, sometimes, just a bit too much.

This dedication can and has (maybe unjustifiably) driven some people away from the realm of all things MJK; at three separate shows I attended in Portland since January 2014—with one of them just last week, the bass player soundchecked by noodling on Tool’s ‘Schism’ before descending into laughter and quickly moving on.

It seems fitting, then, that Puscifer can be seen as a reaction of sorts to the deification that led to this; an outlet for all things bizarre and ludicrous, as well as sincere and straightforward—all from the autonomous efforts of Keenan and his revolving band of contributors. On Saturday night, Portland had its taste of that imagination in full-blown technicolor, with the group stopping by the Keller Auditorium to support its third LP, Money Shot, released just last month.

'Luchafer' // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

‘Luchafer’ // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

The evening began with a lucha libre wrestling match. Yes, you read that correctly: there was a ring, there were masked wrestlers, there were bleachers onstage for VIP ticketholders and there was pre-recorded commentary. Although it might seem like a strange way to open a rock show, it was anything but; lucha libre masks are featured on the Money Shot album cover. They were also on backdrops throughout the show and were even worn by band members—including Keenan, who never took his off.

Following twenty minutes of pretty remarkable athletics and a quick set changeover (including a videotaped PSA from Keenan as his alter ego, Major Douche, reminding people to please, please not use their phones,) the band launched into the Money Shot cut “Simultaneous,” featuring dual lead vocals by Maynard and key contributor Carina Round—whom it would be fair to say was in as much command of the show as Keenan; they both had the same amount of space on stage, the same movements and even the same outfit.

Puscifer // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Puscifer // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

The set leaned heavily on material from the new album—which is usually a problem for bands, but never so much in Keenan’s case, considering  the audience already seemed to know every syllable of every chorus. The night was nevertheless peppered with choice cuts from Puscifer’s discography, including “Rev 22:20” and “Vagina Mine” from 2007’s V is for Vagina, as well as a placid “Horizons” and an exclamatory “Man Overboard” from 2011’s Conditions of my Parole. They also shifted from the mostly downtempo, steady mood of their songs to aggressive and explosive cuts, bringing out harder-hitting numbers like “The Undertaker” and “Toma,” also respectively from those albums.

Keenan was obviously enjoying himself throughout the show, jovial is spirits nary seen at Tool or A Perfect Circle concerts. The band, too, seemed to be having fun—completed by vocalist Round, guitarist/songwriter Mat Mitchell, drummer Jeff Friedl (who was, no kidding, dressed like the gimp on the cover of Death Grips’ The Money Store,) keyboardist Mahsa Zargaran and Ministry’s own Paul Barker on bass.

Mat Mitchell (left) and Ministry's Paul Barker // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Mat Mitchell (left) and Ministry’s Paul Barker // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

In all, Puscifer’s music places more emphasis on electronics and texture than the time-signature shifting prog rock of Tool and the alt rock experiments of A Perfect Circle. In this sense, their music is also more uniform: the songs stand out less from each other than those of the aforementioned groups. This is not really a drawback, though; Puscifer’s live show is a holistic tease of one’s light and dark sides, the screwball backdrops and masks contrasting greatly with the moody grooves and beautiful vocal harmonies of Keenan and Round.

Puscifer drummer Jeff Friedl // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Puscifer drummer Jeff Friedl // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Perhaps it is this, then, that keeps drawing fans into the creative legacy of Maynard James Keenan: despite honing an aesthetic he set out with twenty-five years ago, every Tool, A Perfect Circle and Puscifer tour has been a marked visual departure from the last. And whether or not you land in the ‘hero-worshippers’ category Lester Bangs wrote about in 1976, it is evident that Maynard’s output has cultivated a notion of integrity and detail absent from many groups on the same barometer. Nearly forty years after Station to Station, it would have been interesting to see what Bangs would make of it all.

Update:

Today marks three years since the first episode of Faces on the Radio went live from the Internet. Like all good things do, we must now come to an end as a podcast.

For the time being, our intent is to continue to cover shows via photography and written reviews on this website. The three of us will still be around, catching shows, photographing bands, going crazy in the front row, talking with people about music, and doing everything you’ve come to expect from the FOTR team – even if you won’t hear about it the following Monday.

We are beyond grateful to every guest, contributor, listener, apartment story participant and each other for the time we all shared together. It’s been a pleasure, a privilege and an honor.

We hope you were taking notes. Have a great one.

FOTR Collage Final Text copy

Project Pabst, Day 2

…and just like that, year two of Project Pabst is a wrap! Head over to our Facebook for photos of Weezer, Buzzcocks, Wild Ones, Passion Pit and much more – including some sweet views from the Ross Island Bridge (like this one!)

Weezer // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

Weezer // Photo by Yousef Hatlani

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