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Can u get hiv from giving oral to a woman

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Back to Sexual health. HIV is transmitted through seminal and vaginal fluids, including menstrual fluids. The virus can enter the body through the bloodstream or by passing through delicate mucous membranes, such as inside the vagina, rectum or urethra. If a person gives fellatio and has bleeding gums, a cut, or an ulcer inside their mouth, HIV could enter their bloodstream through infected fluid.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: HIV Transmission and HIV Risk

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: HIV FAQ: Can you be infected with HIV via oral sex?

HIV Transmission and Risks

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Many people find oral sex an intensely pleasurable experience. People use different terms to refer to oral sex including formal terms like fellatio and cunnilingus and slang terms like blow jobs and giving head. Usually oral sex means one person kissing, licking or sucking another person's genitals.

Doctors and researchers can't be sure how many people have acquired HIV through oral sex. In late , researchers looked at all the available evidence and calculated that the risk of acquiring HIV from oral sex was very low, but that it wasn't zero. It is clear that oral sex involves much less risk than anal or vaginal sex. HIV is most easily passed on during anal sex, vaginal sex, sharing injecting equipment, and from mother to baby. It is much less likely that HIV will be passed on during oral sex, but it is possible in some circumstances.

It depends on the viral load of the person living with HIV and the dental health of the person performing oral sex. It's a good idea to have regular sexual health check-ups. The risk of HIV being passed on during oral sex centres on fluid containing HIV semen, vaginal fluid or blood finding a way into the bloodstream of an HIV-negative person via the mouth or throat, which is more likely if there is inflammation, or cuts or sores present. HIV is not passed on through exposure to saliva alone, so a person with HIV performing oral sex on someone who is HIV negative is not considered to be a transmission risk.

The other factor that makes a big difference to the potential risk of HIV transmission from oral sex is the viral load of the person living with HIV. Viral load is the term used to describe the amount of HIV in a sample of body fluid. People living with HIV have the viral load in their blood measured regularly, as part of routine health monitoring. When a person living with HIV is taking effective HIV treatment, their viral load should decline until it is so low that it cannot be detected by the tests.

This does not mean the person is cured of HIV, and if they stopped taking treatment their viral load would go back up. There is good evidence that when someone is taking treatment and has an undetectable viral load, they cannot pass HIV on through sexual activity — including oral sex.

Kissing, licking or sucking another person's genitals, i. Measurement of the amount of virus in a blood sample, reported as number of HIV RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma. An undetectable viral load is the first goal of antiretroviral therapy.

Although HIV can be sexually transmitted, the term is most often used to refer to chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, herpes, scabies, trichomonas vaginalis, etc. If you are living with HIV, there is a higher risk of passing on HIV through someone performing oral sex on you, if you are not taking treatment and if you also have an untreated sexually transmitted infection. If you don't have HIV and you are performing oral sex on someone who does have HIV, you are at more risk of acquiring HIV if you have cuts, sores or abrasions in your mouth or on your gums.

For men, having a high viral load in the blood may also mean that viral load is high in the semen. Factors like untreated sexually transmitted infections can cause viral load in semen to increase.

For women, the levels of HIV in vaginal fluid vary. They are likely to be highest around the time of menstruation having your period , when HIV-bearing cells shed from the cervix are most likely to be found in vaginal fluid, along with blood. Oral sex will therefore be more risky around the time of menstruation. There are several ways to reduce the risk of HIV transmission from oral sex.

Naturally, some will be more acceptable than others to different individuals, so you must make your own decisions about the level of risk you find acceptable. If you would like to discuss these issues, ask to see a health adviser, or other health professional, at your HIV treatment centre or sexual health clinic. Many of the strategies below will also provide protection against other sexually transmitted infections:. If you are living with HIV, taking HIV treatment as prescribed, so that you maintain an undetectable viral load is the most effective way of preventing HIV being passed on.

Primary tabs View active tab Preview. Greta Hughson. November The risk of getting HIV through oral sex is low, but not non-existent, when a person with HIV does not have fully suppressed viral load. Glossary oral sex Kissing, licking or sucking another person's genitals, i. Next review date. This page was last reviewed in November It is due for review in November Related topics.

Sexual transmission. The biology of HIV transmission.

Can HIV be transmitted through oral sex (fellatio and cunnilingus)?

Oral sex is sex that involves the mouth and the penis, vagina, or anus butt hole. Some other words for different kinds of oral sex are "blow job," "giving head," "going down on," "eating out," "sucking," "cunnilingus," or "rimming. There are a few known cases of people getting HIV from giving oral sex licking or sucking. There are no known cases of someone getting HIV from receiving oral sex being licked or sucked.

After more than 35 years of epidemiological and biomedical research, the question of whether you can get HIV from oral sex remains confusing. So let's start by separating hypotheticals from the hard facts and statistics. If asking can a person get HIV from oral sex, the honest answer would have to be possible but unlikely.

All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy. HIV is not transmitted though saliva, urine, feces, vomit, sweat, animals, bugs or the air. In the United States, sexual contact is the most common way that HIV is passed from person to person.

What Is the Risk of HIV from Oral Sex?

The chances of HIV being passed from one person to another depend on the type of contact. HIV is most easily spread or transmitted through unprotected anal sex, unprotected vaginal sex, and sharing injection drug equipment. Unprotected sex means sex in which no condoms or other barriers are used. Recent research has shown that people living with HIV who take HIV drugs and whose viral load is undetectable too low to be found with standard tests cannot pass the virus on to their sexual partners even during unprotected sex. That said, unprotected sex puts you at risk for other sexually transmitted infections. Oral sex involves contact between the mouth and the genitals. Under most circumstances, oral sex poses little to no risk of transmitting HIV. Oral sex may not be risk-free, but it has been shown to be much less risky than anal or vaginal sex, or sharing needles. There is HIV virus in female sexual fluid vaginal secretions , male sexual fluids semen or ejaculate, also called "cum" and "pre-cum" , and blood. HIV cannot be spread through saliva spit.

Oral Sex and HIV Risk

Oral sex involves using the mouth to stimulate the penis fellatio , vagina cunnilingus , or anus anilingus. However, it is hard to know the exact risk because a lot of people who have oral sex also have anal or vaginal sex. The type of oral sex that may be the riskiest is mouth-to-penis oral sex. But the risk is still very low, and much lower than with anal or vaginal sex. Though the risk of HIV transmission through oral sex is low, several factors may increase that risk, including sores in the mouth or vagina or on the penis, bleeding gums, oral contact with menstrual blood, and the presence of other sexually transmitted diseases STDs.

HIV infects humans and causes damage by taking over cells in the immune system—the part of the body that usually works to fight off germs, bacteria and disease. When that happens, the body may not be able to fight off certain types of illnesses or cancers.

The risk of getting HIV through receiving oral sex that is, a partner's mouth on your genitals is very, very low. We can't say that there's zero risk, because there are a few cases of HIV infection in people who have no other known risk factors for HIV. Also, we can imagine a scenario where an HIV-infected person's mouth is bleeding when he or she is giving oral sex. This could increase the risk of infecting the partner.

Can I get HIV from oral sex?

So it's 2am, you're in a bathroom at a house party and some guy you just met is breathing into your stomach while he unzips your fly. What do you need to know before you shove your dick in his mouth? Blowjobs should be a great time for everyone involved, and getting rid of any misconceptions about HIV and STIs means you can enjoy the moment without worry.

It is also possible to catch HIV through unprotected oral sex, but the risk is much lower. HIV is not passed on easily from one person to another. The virus does not spread through the air like cold and flu viruses. HIV lives in the blood and in some body fluids. Other body fluids, like saliva, sweat or urine, do not contain enough of the virus to infect another person. It uses the CD4 cells to make thousands of copies of itself.

A partnership where one person is infected with HIV and the other is not can be described as a sero-discordant or discordant relationship. There is a risk of HIV transmission if the discordant couple has unprotected sex. However, this risk can be greatly reduced with the use of condoms during vaginal, anal and oral sex. Both partners in a discordant sexual relationship should take on the responsibility of protecting one another from HIV infection. Although anyone can be at risk for HIV, some people can be more at risk depending upon the types of sexual practices and drug use they are engaging in. Being gay does not necessarily mean you are at higher risk, but certain activities gay men sometimes participate in might put them at greater risk.

Jun 24, - If asking can a person get HIV from oral sex, the honest answer would have to be For the most part, oral sex—either in terms of fellatio (oral-penile), By understanding and identifying these factors, you can make better, more been a documented case of a woman or her partner getting HIV after having.

Related: All topics , HIV transmission. I only had oral sex with her. She gave me a blowjob. Do I need to get HIV test? There have been no known cases of a man getting HIV by giving a woman oral sex or if a man receives oral sex.

Many people find oral sex an intensely pleasurable experience. People use different terms to refer to oral sex including formal terms like fellatio and cunnilingus and slang terms like blow jobs and giving head. Usually oral sex means one person kissing, licking or sucking another person's genitals. Doctors and researchers can't be sure how many people have acquired HIV through oral sex.

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Comments: 2
  1. Arataur

    Useful question

  2. Dugami

    Many thanks for an explanation, now I will not commit such error.

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