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My girlfriend needs professional help

I walked into Barnes and Noble to just search and look around for something to grab my attention. Then my sister came I received this book through the Early Reviewers program; however, I just couldn't get into reading it. After several tries, it'll remain on my shelf.

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How to Persuade Your Loved One to Seek Professional Help

I was a newly minted freshman in college, with mounting anxiety over essays and tests and the lingering effects of some adolescent mental-health concerns, when I realized I could stand to benefit from therapy. But knowing and doing something about it are two different things, and it took me until the fall of junior year to actually seek out a therapist — and even then, I attended only a few sessions before giving up. Simply put, I was too anxious.

I was too busy and too freaked out. In hindsight, I wish someone had nudged me back into therapy sooner — and I try now to be that nudge for other people. Many of these barriers are legitimate, notes Stephen Seligman, a clinical psychiatry professor at the University of California, San Francisco.

The price of private therapy sessions can be prohibitive, for instance. Still, low-cost options do exist, from therapy collectives such as Open Path to therapists offering sliding-scale rates. If you need it badly enough, chances are you can find something in your price range.

If you know someone who might need help , this can be extremely frustrating to watch. One way to do this is by bringing the conversation back to you and your own experience. Making it personal also has the added benefit of reducing embarrassment about going to therapy. Klein notes that despite advancements in the cultural conversation around therapy, stigma around the practice still looms.

Which is a shame, because nearly everyone has some kind of issue that therapy could help. Talking about your own experience with therapy can help normalize the experience, and make someone feel less isolated in their issues.

Talk straight. This is particularly true for acute mental illnesses, he adds. If someone is going through something immediate and urgent, such as a suicidal urge, they can feel that nobody is treating it seriously if nobody confronts them directly. This will increase their isolation and likely their symptoms. Gann cautions to be sensitive in your application of direct language, and to mediate it depending on your relationship with the individual and their issues.

Frame it with care. This sounds almost trite — but too often, he says, our raw feelings of anger and hurt may cloud how we talk to them: We may shame or blame them, or simply phrase our statements without much compassion. To do this, it helps to distance yourself from the other person for a second, and remember that they are not their mental-health issues.

Picture the things you like about them in your head. If you want to take it to the next level, Seligman says, you can also show them you care through pragmatic acts of service, which has the added benefit of reducing the logistical hurdles.

You can drive them to therapy for the first few sessions, or offer to sit with them while looking for lower-cost options. You might even suggest the two of you start therapy at the same time. A while ago, I was in a relationship with a guy whose immature behavior indicated deeper emotional issues.

Even after we ended things, I kept spending time him, confident he would seek help, and trusting he would reform the way he acted toward me.

I even sent him the contact information of a therapist in town. The last time we hung out, he reiterated that he needed a therapist. The next day, I deleted his contact information from my phone, unfriended him on Facebook, and unfollowed him on Twitter. We still interact sometimes, but emotionally, I keep my distance.

At the very least, setting boundaries with someone will give you peace of mind. Already a subscriber? Log in or link your magazine subscription. Account Profile. Sign Out. Tags: top story how does that make you feel science of us self health and wellness mental health therapy More.

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Here is what you should know — and what steps to take — if your girlfriend is dealing with depression. We all have blue days, but if you want to help your girlfriend with depression, the first thing you need to do is learn the difference between depression and everyday sadness. While sad feelings may come and go due to personal or professional issues, depression can last months or years. Depression can come in many different forms.

Before you can post or reply in these forums, please join our online community. My long term boyfriend is suffering from depression and anxiety and has been for about months.

He just sits and watches TV. Lynn was right to be concerned. First, know what symptoms you are looking for. Be concerned if your loved one:.

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The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. This article was published more than 8 years ago. Some information in it may no longer be current. My wife is fundamentally against the idea of counselling - she's depressed, unsatisfied with life and has serious body image issues. But I think she needs to see an expert. How can I convince her it's a good idea? It can frustrating and saddening for any of us to see someone we love being unhappy and struggling with life.

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This copy is for your personal non-commercial use only. I continue to regularly see my doctor and take prescribed medication. A family member sexually abused my girlfriend as a child. She occasionally texts me saying that she wants to commit suicide. Her negative moods and outbursts affect me.

Many people find themselves supporting a partner with depression at some point in their lives. The support of family and friends can play an important role in the treatment of mental health conditions.

Practical advice for obtaining quality mental healthcare when money is tight. Thanks to mental health parity, many more people have access to psychotherapy than in the past. But two great barriers to treatment remain. The first is shame, as the stigma of mental illness still prevents many from seeking professional help.

How to Encourage Someone to See a Therapist

By: bigbirdz. Do you love your partner, but feel your relationship is stuck on repeat because of his or her behaviour? Do you want them to seek the help of a c ounsellor or psychotherapist but they are not listening to you?

Approaching an individual and encouraging them to seek therapy can be a tricky situation. If done the wrong way, you could aggravate the person or turn them against the idea entirely. However, there is an effective way to have this conversation. Misconception about mental health and therapy has intensified stigma in society. Your loved one may be aware that they need help, but may be afraid to seek it if they think you will judge or treat them differently. Therefore, it is essential to use non-stigmatizing language when talking with them about their mental health.

What to do when someone doesn’t want help

The feeling was mutual, we began dating exclusively immediately and talked of moving in together and marriage. Several months in, she discovered that I had a female friend with whom I often communicate by text. However, nearly a year later, she still daily questions me about my friendships and even my past relationships. The thought of living together and being questioned daily about my past is unacceptable. Yet, she refuses to leave me, and insists that we work through things together.

You can feel a bit lost when someone close to you needs help but doesn't want to accept it.

Mark S. The good news is that treatments for mental illness are highly effective. The bad news is that only one out of three people might actually seek help.

How to support a partner with depression

I was a newly minted freshman in college, with mounting anxiety over essays and tests and the lingering effects of some adolescent mental-health concerns, when I realized I could stand to benefit from therapy. But knowing and doing something about it are two different things, and it took me until the fall of junior year to actually seek out a therapist — and even then, I attended only a few sessions before giving up. Simply put, I was too anxious. I was too busy and too freaked out.

Help! My Partner Needs Therapy But Won’t Go

Find out more about cookies and your privacy in our policy. And get some tips on how to support them, including knowing what to do when things get really serious. Coming around to the realisation that they're going through a rough patch can be scary and difficult, so it's understandable that they may take some time before deciding to seek help. Continue to be supportive.

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Comments: 4
  1. Gakus

    What words... super, a magnificent idea

  2. Kishakar

    I am sorry, that I interrupt you, would like to offer other decision.

  3. Akinorg

    In my opinion, you are not right.

  4. Sahn

    It certainly is not right

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